68 10 Things to Know about the Impossible Turn after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency + GA News


68 10 Things to Know about the Impossible Turn after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency + GA News

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The Impossible Turn
10 Things to Know after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency
#1 When the engine quits on takeoff, land straight ahead. Don’t turn back to the runway unless you have no other good options.
#2 Understand that Your Lizard Brain will take over in an Emergency And will tell you to turn back to the runway.
#3 Understand that people die trying the impossible turn
#4 Teaching and practicing the impossible turn at low altitude is malpractice!
#5 There is almost always a better alternatives than turning back to the runway.
#6 It’s NOT a 180 degree turn to go back to the runway—it’s far more complicated than that.
#7 Choosing the optimal bank angle to get back to the runway will be very tricky.
#8 The steeper your bank angle, the more rapidly stall speed rises.
#9 You might not make it back to the runway, and if you do, you’ll be landing with a tailwind.
#10 Always do a pretakeoff briefing Before you take off.
Max’s Blog article on the Impossible Turn
Max’s Blog article – Impossible Turn Part II
NTSB Report – Impossible Turn Livermore, CA
NTSB Report – Impossible Turn Cirrus SR20

Max answers a listener question about about pilot statistics, how many pilots there are, how many are women, and how many pilots have instrument ratings.

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Mentioned in the Show
Part 61 Changes – 53 page PDF
Instrument Flight Procedures Information Gateway
Luke AFB SATR
U.S. Civil Airmen Statistics

News Stories
Two flight school employees in Redding, CA charged with kidnapping and other charges related to trying to force a student pilot to return to China.

Instrument Pilot IFR Tips – Briefing the Approach, iPhone iOS 11 update + GA News


Everyone knows that when flying VFR, that a pilot’s priorities are to aviate, navigate, and communicate. But when flying IFR, pilots are often confused by their priorities when faced with a high task load while preparing to fly an instrument approach. 2008 National Flight Instructor of the Year Max Trescott explains that IFR pilots should prioritize these three things above all other activities. 1. Rolling out onto headings 2. Leveling off at Altitudes 3. Intercepting the final approach course Getting the ATIS, briefing the approach, talking to ATC and everything else are all lower priorities. Max then talks about how to brief an instrument approach while in cruise flight and setting up for an instrument approach.

Click here for the listener survey. Tell us what flight planning tools you use when planning a longer flight.

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News Stories

Unstable Approach Definition and Private Pilot Tips for How to Fly a Stable Approach + GA News


You’ve undoubtedly heard of a stabilized approach and know it’s helpful to have one prior to landing. But many pilots don’t know all of the elements of a stabilized approach, or the potential expense of an unstable approach. Last year, two pilots I know dug deep into their wallets to pay for damage resulting from landings that followed unstable approaches. Both considered going around, but didn’t. The pilots of an IFR charter fight into Akron, Ohio in November 2015 weren’t so lucky; everyone died after their unstable approach.

So what is a stabilized approach, and why does it matter? Cirrus Aircraft’s Flight Operations Manual gives a good description. It says: “A stabilized approach is characterized by a constant angle and constant rate of descent approach profile ending near the touch-down point. Stabilized approach criteria apply to all approaches including practice power-off approaches.“ It goes on to say that for VFR landings, an “approach is considered stabilized when all of the following criteria are achieved by 500′ AGL:

  • Proper airspeed,
  • Correct flight path,
  • Correct aircraft configuration for phase of flight,
  • Appropriate power setting for aircraft configuration,
  • Normal angle and rate of descent,
  • Only minor corrections are required to correct deviations.

A go-around must be executed if the above conditions are not met, and the aircraft is not stabilized by 500′ AGL.” This episode contains lots of tips to help you consistently fly stable approaches every time you fly the traffic pattern, including tips for long, straight-in approaches, which often lead to unstable approaches.

Click here for the listener survey. Tell us what flight planning tools you use when planning a longer flight.

Please visit my new Patreon page and make a contribution to help me with my goal of improving the AviationNewsTalk.com website.

You can Dictate a listener question from your phone and I’ll try to answer it on a future show, or send an email.

News Stories