113 Understanding Aircraft Electrical Systems and Failures + General Aviation News


113 Understanding Aircraft Electrical Systems and Failures + General Aviation News

Your Cirrus Specialist. Call me if you’re thinking of buying a new Cirrus SR20 or SR22. Call 1-650-967-2500 for Cirrus purchase and training assistance, or to take my online seminar: So You Want to Fly or Buy a Cirrus.

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Summary
Max talks about Aircraft Electrical Systems and Failures using the Cessna 172 and Cirrus SR22 as examples. Alternators, Generators, voltage regulators, and batteries are discussed. Common electrical system failures and the checklists to be followed are discussed for low voltage situations and for over voltage and over current situations.

News Stories

Mentioned in the Show
Rio Hondo Wash Bonanza Engine Out
IMC Club
Free FAA Written Exams

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So You Want To Learn to Fly or Buy a Cirrus seminars
Online Version of the Seminar Coming Soon – Register for Notification

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107 12 Steps for Handling an Engine Failure in Flight + General Aviation News


107 12 Steps for Handling an Engine Failure in Flight + GA News

Your Cirrus Specialist. Call me if you’re thinking of buying a new Cirrus SR20 or SR22. Call 1-650-967-2500 for Cirrus purchase and training assistance, or to take my online seminar: So You Want to Fly or Buy a Cirrus.

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Summary
107 Max talks about the statistics for engine failures in flight and the 12 step procedure you should follow if you have an engine failure. The procedures described are generic, and may be differ for your aircraft, so check your POH.
#1 Don’t panic, wind the clock.
#2 Turn toward an airport or landing site at the first sign of engine trouble.
#3 Fly best glide speed
#4 Clean up the airplane
#5 Memorize the first few steps of the checklist
#6 Troubleshoot the three things your engine needs to operate: fuel, spark, and air
#7 Communicate and squawk 7700
#8 Use crew resource management and delegate tasks to others on board
#9 Shut down everything related to fuel and electricity
#10 Have a strategy for managing your descent
#11 Open the doors while you’re still in the air
#12 Use any automation tools that you have available to you

Mentioned in the Show
ANT EP #68 – Impossible Turn after Takeoff Engine Failure
Robert Wright Article – The Real Risks of Engine Failure

Videos Mentioned in the Show
SAFE CFI Candidates Weaknesses Video

If you love the show and want more, visit my Patreon page to see fun videos, breaking news, and other posts in the Posts section. And if you decide to make a small donation each month,  you can get some goodies!

So You Want To Learn to Fly or Buy a Cirrus seminars
Wednesday, May 8 7:30 PM at Palo Alto, CA – Register here
Wednesday, May 15 7:30 PM at San Carlos, CA – Register here
Thursday, May 23 6:00 PM at Sacramento, CA – Register here
Online Version of the Seminar Coming Soon – Register for Notification

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103 Cirrus CAPS Parachute Pull over the Caribbean – Interview Ed Regensburg


103 Cirrus CAPS Parachute Pull over the Caribbean – Interview Ed Regensburg

Your Cirrus Specialist. Call me if you’re thinking of buying a new Cirrus SR20 or SR22. Call 1-650-967-2500 for Cirrus purchase and training assistance.

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Summary
On March 5, 2019, two pilots flying a Cirrus SR22 noticed oil pressure dropping rapidly, and soon after, the engine quit. They turned toward land 30 miles away and pulled the airplane’s CAPS parachute. They deployed their raft, which flipped over in eight to ten foot swells. The pilot dived out to right the raft and both men got aboard. But they had no idea who might be coming to rescue them.

Thirty minutes later, a US Coast Guard plane appeared flying a search pattern looking for the men. They tried to use the two flares to signal the plane, but both flares failed to ignite. As the plane flew away in the distance, they didn’t know if they’d been seen.

One of the pilots got sick in the rough seas and began throwing up over the side. About two hours later, the other pilot spotted a ship in the distance. Both men wondered would the ship see them. And if it didn’t, would it accidentally run them over?

Princess Cruises’ Regal Princess was sailing towards St. Thomas, when the US Coast Guard requested that they reverse course to search for the men. The Regal Princess is twenty stories high and was easy for the pilots to spot miles away, but by contrast, they were just a small dot that rose and fell among the waves and white caps.

The pilots Ed Regensburg and Dan Tucker were eventually spotted and brought aboard the cruise ship. In this podcast, Ed Regensburg describe the entire experience from when he first spotted the low oil pressure warning until they were home again in Greensboro, NC.

If you love the show and want more, visit my Patreon page to see fun videos, breaking news, and other posts in the Posts section. And if you decide to make a small donation each month,  you can get some goodies!

Check out our recommended ADS-B receivers, and order one for yourself. Yes, we’ll make a couple of dollars if you do. 

Check out our recommended Aviation Headsets, and order one for yourself!

Get the Free Aviation News Talk app for iOS or Android.

Please Take our 2019 Social Media Survey. I’d love to understand how you use, or don’t use, social media, so I can target social media posts and advertising for Aviation News Talk to other people similar to you.

Social Media
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Listen to all Aviation News Talk podcasts on YouTube or YouTube Premium

Max Trescott is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

87 Night IFR Electrical Failure: ATC and a Cell Phone Save a Doctor – Interview with Controller Phil Enis


87 Night IFR Electrical Failure: ATC and a Cell Phone Save a Doctor – Interview with Controller Phil Enis

Your Cirrus Specialist. Call me if you’re thinking of buying a new Cirrus SR20 or SR22. Call 1-650-967-2500 for Cirrus purchase and training assistance.

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Summary
On Super Bowl Sunday, Dr. Peter Edenhoffer was flying IFR at night in a Cessna Cardinal when he lost his electrical system. He’d already texted his son to say goodbye. Then he received a text message from Fort Worth Center which gave him hope for surviving when he realized he wasn’t alone. Max interviews NATCA’s Archie League Medal of Safety President’s Award winner controller Phil Enis about this save. Watch the NATCA video to hear more of the ATC radio transmissions and see more of the text messages from this save. It also includes a link where to where you can watch Dr. Peter Edenhoffer talk about what was going through his mind as he was alone in the dark.

Here are some ideas you should consider on future IFR flights including:
1. Include a cell phone or satellite phone number in the Remarks section of your IFR flight, so that controllers can attempt to reach you by phone or text, if they lose radio communications with you.
2. Bring a handheld radio when you fly. Set it up and test it ahead of time so that you know that it works. Handheld radios in metal airplanes receive OK, but often don’t transmit well because they’re essentially inside a shielded cage (the airplane!). Installing an external antenna on your airplane will greatly improve the transmit capability of a handheld radio.
3. If you have an electrical failure, use an EFB app like ForeFlight to navigate to an airport with better weather.
4. If you have cell phone service, consider calling 911 and have them pass along  your cellphone number to an air traffic controller.

If you love the show and want more, visit my Patreon page to see fun videos, breaking news, and other posts in the Posts section. And if you decide to make a small donation each month,  you can get some goodies!

Check out our recommended ADS-B receivers, and order one for yourself. Yes, we’ll make a couple of dollars if you do. 

Check out our recommended Aviation Headsets, and order one for yourself!

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Please Take our 2018 Listener Survey. I’d love to get your feedback and ideas for improving this podcast.

Mentioned in the Show
NATCA
Who Was Archie League?

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68 10 Things to Know about the Impossible Turn after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency + GA News


68 10 Things to Know about the Impossible Turn after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency + GA News

Your Cirrus Specialist. Call me if you’re thinking of buying a new Cirrus SR20 or SR22. Call 1-650-967-2500 for Cirrus purchase and training assistance.

Send us an email – http://www.sjflight.com/Forms/inquiry.htm

If you have a question you’d like answered on the show, let listeners hear you ask the question, by recording your listener question using your phone.

The Impossible Turn
10 Things to Know after a Takeoff Engine Failure Emergency
#1 When the engine quits on takeoff, land straight ahead. Don’t turn back to the runway unless you have no other good options.
#2 Understand that Your Lizard Brain will take over in an Emergency And will tell you to turn back to the runway.
#3 Understand that people die trying the impossible turn
#4 Teaching and practicing the impossible turn at low altitude is malpractice!
#5 There is almost always a better alternatives than turning back to the runway.
#6 It’s NOT a 180 degree turn to go back to the runway—it’s far more complicated than that.
#7 Choosing the optimal bank angle to get back to the runway will be very tricky.
#8 The steeper your bank angle, the more rapidly stall speed rises.
#9 You might not make it back to the runway, and if you do, you’ll be landing with a tailwind.
#10 Always do a pretakeoff briefing Before you take off.
Max’s Blog article on the Impossible Turn
Max’s Blog article – Impossible Turn Part II
NTSB Report – Impossible Turn Livermore, CA
NTSB Report – Impossible Turn Cirrus SR20

Max answers a listener question about about pilot statistics, how many pilots there are, how many are women, and how many pilots have instrument ratings.

Question of the Month
Send us your audio recordings by July 31, 2018 answering this question: What did you learn after you got  your private pilot certificate that you wished you learned while working on your private certificate? Click here to record  your answer. 

If you love the show and want more, visit my Patreon page to see fun videos, breaking news, and other posts  in the Blog section. And if you decide to make a small donation each month,  you can get some goodies!

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Mentioned in the Show
Part 61 Changes – 53 page PDF
Instrument Flight Procedures Information Gateway
Luke AFB SATR
U.S. Civil Airmen Statistics

News Stories
Two flight school employees in Redding, CA charged with kidnapping and other charges related to trying to force a student pilot to return to China.

Instrument Pilot IFR Tips – Briefing the Approach, iPhone iOS 11 update + GA News


Everyone knows that when flying VFR, that a pilot’s priorities are to aviate, navigate, and communicate. But when flying IFR, pilots are often confused by their priorities when faced with a high task load while preparing to fly an instrument approach. 2008 National Flight Instructor of the Year Max Trescott explains that IFR pilots should prioritize these three things above all other activities. 1. Rolling out onto headings 2. Leveling off at Altitudes 3. Intercepting the final approach course Getting the ATIS, briefing the approach, talking to ATC and everything else are all lower priorities. Max then talks about how to brief an instrument approach while in cruise flight and setting up for an instrument approach.

Click here for the listener survey. Tell us what flight planning tools you use when planning a longer flight.

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News Stories

Overcoming Checkride Anxiety – 14 ways to reduce your fears + GA News


Everyone feels nervous to some extent when they go for a checkride, so we share 14 ways to reduce your anxiety before and during a checkride. Checkride anxiety applies to student pilots in particular because it’s your first checkride. But it also applies to all pilots who think that someday they’ll go for an instrument, or maybe a multiengine, seaplane, glider, Commercial, ATP, or CFI checkride. Professional pilots working for a Part 135 charter company or an airline, also have to periodically be rechecked.

Here’s a brief summary of the 14 ways to reduce your nervousness about a checkride. Note: You’ll hear far more details about each one in the podcast.

  1. If possible, meet the examiner ahead of time.
  2. Clear the deck for at least a week before the checkride.
  3. Do whatever it takes to guarantee that you get a decent amount of sleep the night before the checkride.
  4. Make sure you have all of your paperwork in order.
  5. Become intimately familiar with the ACS oral section,
  6. Use a study guide like the ASA Private Oral Exam guide to help you prepare for the oral.
  7. Do a mock checkride with your instructor or another flight instructor.
  8. If there’s a gouge available, a report that someone has written about their checkride with your examiner, see if you can find it and read it ahead of time.
  9. Don’t get upset if you make some mistakes on your last flight before the checkride.
  10. Prepare for a long day; bring some food!
  11. When you walk in for your checkride, exhibit confidence, but not cockiness.
  12. Know that it’s OK to tell the DPE a joke.
  13. If you start getting nervous, and feel you’re not doing well, ask for a timeout.
  14. Go into the checkride with just the tiniest bit of indifference or apathy, so you won’t be too upset if you don’t pass.

Click here for the listener survey. Tell us what flight planning tools you use when planning a longer flight.

Please visit my new Patreon page and make a contribution to help me with my goal of improving the AviationNewsTalk.com website.

You can Dictate a listener question from your phone and I’ll try to answer it on a future show, or send an email.

News Stories

The CAA has launched a survey for GA pilots flying in U.K. airspace in an effort to encourage ADS-B usage by the flying community. The survey seeks information on the types of devices already used by private pilots and the devices they would prefer to use.

Unstable Approach Definition and Private Pilot Tips for How to Fly a Stable Approach + GA News


You’ve undoubtedly heard of a stabilized approach and know it’s helpful to have one prior to landing. But many pilots don’t know all of the elements of a stabilized approach, or the potential expense of an unstable approach. Last year, two pilots I know dug deep into their wallets to pay for damage resulting from landings that followed unstable approaches. Both considered going around, but didn’t. The pilots of an IFR charter fight into Akron, Ohio in November 2015 weren’t so lucky; everyone died after their unstable approach.

So what is a stabilized approach, and why does it matter? Cirrus Aircraft’s Flight Operations Manual gives a good description. It says: “A stabilized approach is characterized by a constant angle and constant rate of descent approach profile ending near the touch-down point. Stabilized approach criteria apply to all approaches including practice power-off approaches.“ It goes on to say that for VFR landings, an “approach is considered stabilized when all of the following criteria are achieved by 500′ AGL:

  • Proper airspeed,
  • Correct flight path,
  • Correct aircraft configuration for phase of flight,
  • Appropriate power setting for aircraft configuration,
  • Normal angle and rate of descent,
  • Only minor corrections are required to correct deviations.

A go-around must be executed if the above conditions are not met, and the aircraft is not stabilized by 500′ AGL.” This episode contains lots of tips to help you consistently fly stable approaches every time you fly the traffic pattern, including tips for long, straight-in approaches, which often lead to unstable approaches.

Click here for the listener survey. Tell us what flight planning tools you use when planning a longer flight.

Please visit my new Patreon page and make a contribution to help me with my goal of improving the AviationNewsTalk.com website.

You can Dictate a listener question from your phone and I’ll try to answer it on a future show, or send an email.

News Stories